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Public exposed to measles in Santa Clara and Santa Cruz counties

Public exposed to measles in Santa Clara and Santa Cruz counties

SAN JOSE – Santa Clara County health officials are urging members of the public to review their immunization records after a person with measles visited the area last week.

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The person, who lives in another state, traveled to three locations in Santa Clara and Santa Cruz counties while contagious, according to the Santa Clara County Public Health Department.

Health officials said members of the public were potentially exposed to the viral disease at the Starbucks at 624 Blossom Hill Road in Los Gatos between 9:30 a.m. and 11:30 a.m. on July 1, Taqueria Los Pericos at 139 Water St. in Santa Cruz between 6 p.m. and 10 p.m. on July 1, and San Jose Mineta International Airport Terminal B and Southwest Airlines Flight WN 2804 between 5:15 a.m. and 7:30 a.m. on July 2.

Anyone who visited those places during those times and dates should review their immunization records to learn if they are protected from measles, according to the health department.

Health officials also urged anyone who is pregnant, an infant, has a weakened immune system or is not immunized to contact their health care provider right away.

Finally, members of the public should monitor for symptoms for seven days to three weeks after the day of potential exposure, according to the health department.

Common symptoms of measles include fever, cough, runny nose, red eyes and a rash. Some people may develop more serious complications.

“Measles is highly contagious and spreads through the air when someone with measles speaks, coughs, or sneezes. It is very easy for anyone close to the individual to become infected,” Dr. Monika Roy, a communicable disease controller and assistant health officer with the public health department, said in a statement.

“Call your doctor right away if you think you may have been exposed,” Roy continued. “Quick action can prevent many more people from becoming sick with this serious disease.”

The county health department is working with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the California Department of Public Health to identify any individuals who may have been exposed to measles and get them the care they need.

At a news conference Monday afternoon, Roy urged members of the public to get vaccinated.

“The good news is that people who have the measles vaccine are very well protected,” she said, adding that two doses of the measles, mumps and rubella, or MMR, vaccine are 97% effective against measles. “It does dramatically decrease your risk.”